Course Syllabus

  • General Information (Click to Expand)
    • Professor Information

      Professor Photo
      Instructor:
      Erin Weston
      Phone:
      (305) 348-1329
      Office:
      DM 322B (MMC)
      Office Hours:
      By Appointment
      E-mail:
      Please use Canvas course messages
       

      Course Description And Purpose

      “Studies in World Religions” is a survey of the major religious traditions of the world. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of these traditions, and to enable students to think sensitively and critically about the religious world. This course will cover general concepts in: the Academic Study of Religion, Indigenous Religious Practices, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Alternative Paths, and Religion and the Modern World. In an effort to create a multifaceted understanding of the myriad ways in which the sacred is expressed, we will be viewing both orthodox and various popular forms of religious expression.

      Course Objectives

      Students will be able to:

      • identify the essential characteristics that distinguish the major religious traditions;
      • describe the basic components of each major religious tradition, such as its myths, rituals, doctrines, ethics, and artistic expressions;
      • describe religious conflicts and trends in the modern world;
      • express ideas and opinions clearly in writing as well as orally;

      Global Learning Objectives

      Students will be able to:

      • Global Awareness: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the interrelatedness of local, global, international, and intercultural issues, trends, and systems.
      • Global Perspective: Students will be able to conduct a multi-perspective analysis of local, global, international, and intercultural problems.
      • Global Engagement: Students will be able to demonstrate willingness to engage in local, global, international, and intercultural problem solving.

      This course may satisfy either the Foundations or the Discipline-Specific Global Learning graduation requirements.

  • Important Information (Click to Expand) 
      • Policies

        Please review the FIU's Policies webpage. The policies webpage contains essential information regarding guidelines relevant to all courses at FIU, as well as additional information about acceptable netiquette for online courses.

        Technical Requirements & Skills

        One of the greatest barriers to taking an online course is a lack of basic computer literacy. By computer literacy we mean being able to manage and organize computer files efficiently, and learning to use your computer's operating system and software quickly and easily. Keep in mind that this is not a computer literacy course; but students enrolled in online courses are expected to have moderate proficiency using a computer. Please go to the "What's Required" webpage to find out more information on this subject.

        This course utilizes the following tools:

        • Instagram 

        Please visit our Technical Requirements webpage for additional information.

      •  

        Accessibility And Accommodation

        Please visit our ADA Compliance webpage for information about accessibility involving the tools used in this course.

        For additional assistance please contact FIU's Disability Resource Center.

      • Covid-19 Policies

      • Since this is an online course, some of FIU's policies will not impact us directly. The most important thing to note for our class is that if you are diagnosed with Covid-19, please let me know as soon as you can. If you are asymptomatic, you should be able to continue to complete your work as scheduled. If you are symptomatic, then please make sure to let me know as soon as possible. You will be able to make up your work with a positive Covid-19 test, but please note that some graded assignments may be given in an alternate format to maintain the integrity of the class content. We can work out the details on a case-by-case basis. Please stay safe. You can review more on the Covid-19 policies page.    

        You can contact me directly in the Canvas messages or at eweston@fiu.edu.
         Wishing you a good semester. Please stay healthy! 

       

      • Panthers Care & Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

        If you are looking for help for yourself or a fellow classmate, Panthers Care encourages you to express any concerns you may come across as it relates to any personal behavior concerns or worries you have, for the classmate’s well-being or yours; you are encouraged to share your concerns with FIU’s Panthers Care website.

        Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) offers free and confidential help for anxiety, depression, stress, and other concerns that life brings. Professional counselors are available for same-day appointments. Don’t wait to call 305-348-2277 to set up a time to talk or visit the online self-help portal.

        Academic Misconduct Statement

        Florida International University is a community dedicated to generating and imparting knowledge through excellent teaching and research, the rigorous and respectful exchange of ideas and community service. All students should respect the right of others to have an equitable opportunity to learn and honestly to demonstrate the quality of their learning. Therefore, all students are expected to adhere to a standard of academic conduct, which demonstrates respect for themselves, their fellow students, and the educational mission of the University. All students are deemed by the University to understand that if they are found responsible for academic misconduct, they will be subject to the Academic Misconduct procedures and sanctions, as outlined in the Student Handbook.

        Academic Misconduct includes: Cheating – The unauthorized use of books, notes, aids, electronic sources; or assistance from another person with respect to examinations, course assignments, field service reports, class recitations; or the unauthorized possession of examination papers or course materials, whether originally authorized or not. Plagiarism – The use and appropriation of another’s work without any indication of the source and the representation of such work as the student’s own. Any student who fails to give credit for ideas, expressions or materials taken from another source, including internet sources, is responsible for plagiarism.

        Learn more about the academic integrity policies and procedures as well as student resources that can help you prepare for a successful semester.

        Course Prerequisites

        There are no prerequisites for this course.

        Proctored Exam Policy

        There are no proctored exams in this course.

        Textbook

        Molloy 8th Edition.jpg

        Experiencing the World's Religions: Tradition, Challenge, and Change

        Michael Molloy

        McGraw-Hill Education, 8th Edition, 2021

        ISBN-13: 978-1265318901

         

      • Panther Book Pack & McGraw Hill Connect

         

        What is Panther Book Pack?

        Panther Book Pack is an affordable course materials program providing all undergraduate students with their required course materials by the first day of class at a fixed rate of $20 per credit hour. Students are estimated to save as much as $375 on course materials per semester with the Panther Book Pack program.

         

        While you are automatically enrolled for the Panther Book Pack at the time that you register for classes, you may opt out if you do not wish to participate. We encourage you to compare pricing before you do. If you’ve done the research and still don’t think that the Panther Book Pack is the right fit for you, you can opt out through the MyFIU portal from the day you receive your Panther Book Pack email until three days after the add/ drop date on the Academic Calendar for that term. Please note: The Panther Book Pack program is designed to be an all-in or all-out solution by session for the lowest flat rate possible. Participation is by session for all courses, not by individual course, therefore participation in some courses but not others in each session is not possible. 

         For more information regarding Panther Book Pack, please visit https://shop.fiu.edu/bookpack-2/ .

        How does Panther Book Pack work with Connect?

        Since students are automatically opted in to participate in Panther Book Pack, all students will receive codeless “temporary access” to Connect on day one of class through Canvas.

        For instructions on how to register for Connect through Canvas, please watch this video: http://video.mhhe.com/watch/xUs68jEUwVnAB2K64eWMgc

        Students who remain opted in will have an active Connect license for the remainder of the semester. No further action is needed.

        If students choose to opt out of Panther Book Pack, their Connect access will be revoked shortly after the add/drop period ends. At that time, the students will need to purchase a Connect access code as one will be required in order to regain access. If a student loses access to Connect, their work will be saved.

         

        Who to contact for support?

        Questions related to Panther Book Pack should be directed to Barnes & Noble by emailing bookpack@fiu.edu or calling 305-348-2961. Questions related to Connect should be directed to McGraw Hill Customer Support by calling 1-800-331-5094.

      • Important Note: To successfully view the online videos in this class, you will need a high-speed Internet connection. If you only have dial-up Internet, you will need to visit one of the FIU computer labs to download and watch the videos.

        Expectations Of This Course

        This is an online course, meaning that most of the course work will be conducted online. Expectations for performance in an online course are the same as for a traditional course; in fact, online courses require a degree of self-motivation, self-discipline, and technology skills that can make them more demanding for some students.

        In addition to the completion of writing assignments and exams, the primary requirement for successful completion of this course will be an open mind. Students are expected to exhibit respect to all religious traditions and peoples at all times. Thus, disrespectful or derisive commentary will not be tolerated in this course. Religion is, after all, a very personal and sensitive subject for many.

        On the other hand, class participants can expect academic freedom to express their views. Although religion can be personal, this is an academic course taken for college credit and thus students are expected to examine the topics rigorously. Religion shall not be exempt from the scrutiny placed on any and all academic subjects.

        Students will be responsible for all materials covered in class. Exams may include any and all of the aforementioned materials.

        Students are expected to:

        • Review the how to get started information located in the course content
        • Introduce yourself to the class during the first week by posting a self introduction in the appropriate discussion forum
        • Take the practice quiz to ensure that your computer is compatible with Canvas.
        • Interact online with instructor/s and peers
        • Review and follow the course calendar
        • Log in to the course at least 5 times per week
        • Respond to discussion boards, blogs and journal postings by the deadline.
        • Respond to [messages] within 3 days or sooner.
        • Submit assignments by the corresponding deadline

        The instructor will:

        • Log in to the course 4 times per week
        • Respond to blogs and journal postings within 1 week.
        • Respond to [emails/messages] within 3 days or sooner.
        • Grade assignments within 2 weeks of the assignment deadline.




  • Course Detail (Click to Expand) 
    • Course Communication

      Communication in this course will take place via Messages.

      Messages is a private and secure text-based communication system which occurs within a course among its Course members. Users must log on to Canvas to send, receive, or read messages. The Messages tool is located on the Course Menu, on the left side of the course webpage. It is recommended that students check their messages routinely to ensure up-to-date communication. 

      This is the best method to communicate with your instructor privately.

      Visit our Writing Resources webpage for more information on professional writing and technical communication skills.

      Introduce Yourself Video Blog

      Blogs are an open communications tool for students to share their thoughts. Here you can post text, images, links and attachments, open for comments.

      1. This course has 1 assignment utilizing the Video Blog tool. Within the lesson 1 you will find how to upload a video into the Introduce Yourself blog.  Students will upload all course videos to the particular assignment blogs and by the due date noted in the Blogs portion of this syllabus.
      2. Blogs can be found in the Blog portion of the Discussion or within the content area of the course.

      Assignments

      Assignments

      Assessments

      In order to mitigate any issues with your computer and online assessments, it is very important that you take the "Practice Quiz" from each computer you will be using to take your graded quizzes and exams. It is your responsibility to make sure your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements.

      Assessments in this course are not compatible with mobile devices and should not be taken through a mobile phone or a tablet. If you need further assistance please contact FIU Online Support Services.

      Weekly Blogs

      Blogs are an open communications tool for students to share their thoughts. Here you can post text, images, links and attachments, open for comments.

      There will be twelve blog topics. The topics will be posted in "Discussions" folder in the Course Content. Students must post well thought-out comments based on the required work throughout the semester. Participation is required and represents 12% of your final grade. Both the quantity and the quality of your posts will contribute to your grade. Please see the sample blogs and blog rubric to review the expected components. All students are required to participate in all of the topics (at least 200 words). Blogs must be posted during the period they are assigned and are due by 11:59 pm on the Monday after the end of the lesson. You can miss one blog without penalty. 

      Once you have composed your original posting, take some time to carefully review other postings within your discussion group. Pick two that are most interesting to you and provide meaningful, detailed, and constructive feedback.

      Keep in mind that your discussion forum postings will likely be seen by other members of the course. Care should be taken when determining what to post.

      Quizzes

      A weekly time-restricted, online quiz will be given on each religious tradition. You can take each quiz two times, and the higher of the two attempts will be recorded. Even if you do well on the first attempt, it is advisable to use both attempts. You will not receive the same quiz every time; the computer randomly chooses the questions from a quiz database. The objective questions on the Exam 1 and Exam 2 will be taken directly from this database. Thus, the more times you take the quiz, the more questions you will receive and the better prepared you will be for the exams.

      For the quizzes, you will have 20 minutes to complete 10 questions. Each quiz will be open from Monday of the assigned week to Monday of the following week, and you can take it on any of those days at any time.

      Important Policy on Quiz Resets: Quiz resets will not be granted. You will receive two attempts to complete each quiz, if you are logged offline or you have a technical failure while attempting the quiz, then you still have the second attempt to complete the quiz.  Resetting quizzes after they have passed will require a serious and verifiable reason (death in the family, hospitalization, serious accident, etc.).

      If you know that you will be unable to take a quiz during a specific week, contact the instructor in advance, and the quiz may be opened so you may take it early. It is the responsibility of students to keep up with the readings and take the quizzes on time.

      In order to mitigate any issues with your computer and online assessments, it is very important that you take the "Practice Quiz" from each computer you will be using to take your graded quizzes and exams. It is your responsibility to make sure your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements.

      Assessments in this course are not compatible with mobile devices and should not be taken through a mobile phone or a tablet. If you need further assistance please contact FIU Online Support Services.

      Exams

      The Midterm Exam and the Final Exam are both online and time-restricted examinations. They are located in the Assessments area of the course menu. Students have only one attempt to complete both exams, unlike the course quizzes. Please make note of this important difference.

      Midterm Exam will cover Introduction to Studying Religions, Indigenous Religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto.

      Final Exam will cover Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Alternative Paths, and the Modern Search.

      In order to mitigate any issues with your computer and online assessments, it is very important that you take the "Practice Quiz" from each computer you will be using to take your graded quizzes and exams. It is your responsibility to make sure your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements.

      Assessments in this course are not compatible with mobile devices and should not be taken through a mobile phone or a tablet. If you need further assistance please contact FIU Online Support Services.

      Instagram Assignment

      For this semester, students will be required to participate in an Instagram assignment.  You must submit at least three pictures or Instagram videos throughout the semester and tag these pictures/videos to the FIU Religious Department’s Instagram page @fiu_religion.  Each picture/video must be accompanied by a short comment and the hashtag #Weston1218. The picture/video must demonstrate an interaction between any religion and everyday life. Students are encouraged to interact with the content posted by their classmates and others on the fiu_religion Instagram page.  

      In order to receive credit for this assignment you must:

      • Post at least 1 picture/video by each Instagram assignment due date.  There will be 3.
      • Tag the FIU Religious Department’s Instagram page @fiu_religion
      • Accompany each picture/video with the hashtag #Weston1218
      • Accompany each picture/video with a short comment (<140 characters) about the picture and your purpose for posting it.
      • Post a screenshot to the class discussion board. This makes sure that everyone is able to see it, even if you have privacy settings on your account. 

      Feel free to Review wiki How's "How to Use Instagram webpage."

      In order to use Instagram you will need a mobile device such as a smartphone, ipad, or tablet.  Instagram cannot be accessed on a desktop.  Students who do not have access to a mobile device can upload pictures to the class discussion board.  Students are expected to post responsibly, adhere to copyright laws, and post images that are deemed respectful in accordance with University guidelines. 

       

      Group Wiki Assignment

      Students will work together in groups to present some of the most important contemporary issues that a particular religion is struggling with today and present it in a group wiki.  Religions will be determined by the group title that students sign-up for.  Groups will be divided by their chosen religion.

      Students will be able to sign up for available groups from week 1 - week 3 in the groups section of the course.  

      Students will write up short summaries (at least 250 words) of five contemporary problems, discussing why it is a problem for the religious tradition and how the religion is responding to it.  In addition to student written summaries, your wikis should also include: links to articles and websites, images, infographics, videos, or other relevant visual aids on your group pages. Please review the wiki rubric for a more complete idea of the required elements for a successful wiki page. 

      Your project is only as good as your resources. You need to make sure that you use reliable resources, especially online. There is a lot of misinformation out there! Look for official websites, government websites, academic articles, and legitimate newspaper articles

      Important:
      You will need to do research; your textbook and required readings will not have enough information about the topic. You will need to consult a minimum of three outside sources and one must be a book reference. You will also need notes in your paper, and a Bibliography/Works Cited page in MLA style.

      Do not use Wikipedia as an internet source. You may use internet sources, but use only academic sources from the internet. (Academic sources list individual authors, name their sources, and have institutional affiliations.) Points will be deducted for infractions of these rules. 

      The wiki tool allows the professor the ability to see each students contributions to the group wiki.  Group members are encouraged to equally contribute content to the wiki, as group participation will be factored into your final grade.

      Furthermore, students will have the ability to evaluate their group members and their own contributions to the final project utilizing a iPeer evaluation tool.  This group evaluation assignment is worth 50% of the wiki total grade and must be completed by the wiki due date.  Students will be able to find the iPeer link in the week 15 course content area.

      iPeer Group Evaluation

      iPeer is a web-based software application that allows students to complete evaluations of their peers. . Through this evaluation students will be asked a set of questions examining the quality of each group member's contributions to the particular group assignment.  Students ratings will be anonymous and comments will be required of the evaluator to justify their rating. This is a mandatory assignment that is worth 5.5% of your final grade and is due at the end of the assignment.

      Contemporary Applied Analysis Term Paper

      There will be one essay assigned throughout the semester, which is aimed at assisting in the comprehension and synthesis of the concepts presented throughout the course. This assignment is specifically related to your Global Learning engagement outcome that you will demonstrate an ability to engage critically with diverse forms of religion in local, regional, national and international contexts.

      For your research paper, you will choose a specific religious tradition that we have studied in class and apply it to a contemporary moral or philosophical issue. For example, a paper may explore the response of Theravada Buddhism to prostitution in Thailand. Another example may be to explore abortion through the lens of Japanese Shinto.  Other possibilities include: Brahmanic Hindu perspectives on poverty, Evangelical Christian perspectives on in vitro fertilization (IVF), Native Hawaiian perspectives on genetically modified food.  You may choose to use the religion that you researched for your WIKI, or you may choose another. You must do research on a specific religious group, i.e. Southern Baptists not “Christianity.” You will need to provide a well-thought out argumentative essay where you support your analyses. You must utilize at least three academic sources.

      This essay will be at least 1500-2000 words long (6 pages double-spaced) and will be worth 20% of your grade. This is a formal academic essay and students must cite their sources. MLA is the preferred citation style in Religious Studies. 

      Submission: Students must submit their essays to Turnitin.

      Late Papers: Late papers are only accepted under extreme and verifiable conditions. Papers are deducted 1 letter grade per calendar day and are only accepted within the first 3 days late. 

      Students are responsible for reading their messages and all announcements posted by the instructor. The instructor also reserves the right to make changes to the syllabus by means of announcements or messages with ample time allowed for students to respond and adjust appropriately.

      Plagiarism: Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Plagiarism, or attempting to pass off another's work as your own, falls into three different categories:

      1. A written work that is entirely stolen from another source;
      2. Using quotations from another source without properly citing them; and
      3. Paraphrasing from another source without proper citations.

      Students are expected to understand the definition of plagiarism. See the University Code of Academic Integrity if you need further clarification. Offenders will receive a grade of F for the plagiarized assignment, and possibly the course.

      Important:
      You will need to do research; your textbook and required readings will not have enough information about the topic. You will need to consult a minimum of three outside sources and one must be a book reference. You will also need notes in your paper, and a Bibliography/Works Cited page in MLA style. 

      Do not use Wikipedia as an internet source. You may use internet sources, but use only academic sources from the internet. (Academic sources list individual authors, name their sources, and have institutional affiliations.) Points will be deducted for infractions of these rules.

      If you have questions regarding how to cite or what to cite, ask me BEFORE you submit your essay. If you turn in your paper and you "accidentally" plagiarize parts of your essay, you will fail the assignment and possibly the course. Better safe than sorry! To reiterate, ask me before the due date if you are unsure about how to cite your sources.

      **Students may not submit work from a previous semester or from another class for this assignment or any other assignment in this course. It will be flagged for plagiarism by Turnitin.

      Be sure to read the Grademark comments (feedback) from your professor.

      Grading

      Course Requirements # of Items Weight
      Quizzes 

      12

      10%
      Introduce Yourself Video Blog 1 2%
      Weekly Blog - (1 lowest grade dropped)

      12
       

      15%
      McGraw-Hill LearnSmart Assignments 12 5%
      Instagram Assignment discussion 3 5%
      Paper Proposal  1 1%
      First Draft Paper 1 5%
      Peer Reviews 3 5%
      Final Research Paper  1 10%

      Group Wiki Project -
      (50% content / 50% iPeer grade)

      2 12%

      Midterm Exam

      1 15%
      Final Exam 1 15%
           
      Total 50           100%

       

      Letter Range Letter Range Letter Range
      A Above 95 B 83 - 86 C 70 - 76
      A- 90 - 94 B- 80 - 82 D 60 - 69
      B+ 87 - 89 C+ 77 - 79 F < 59

       

  • Course Calendar (Click to Expand) 
    • Weekly Schedule

      Date Topic Activities
      WEEK 1
      August 23 - Aug 30

      WELCOME – COURSE INTRODUCTION

      Topic: Understanding Religion

      Read

      • Course Introduction
      • Review and fully familiarize yourself with the course and site. Print and read the course syllabus and course calendar.

      Powerpoint

      • Chapter 1 – Understanding Religion

      Videos

      1. Introduction to Religious Studies

      Due: Work ahead complete Lesson 1

       

      1. Student Introduction Video Blog
      WEEK 2
      August 30 - Sept 7
      (extra day for holiday)

      Topic: Indigenous Religions

      PowerPoint

      • Indigenous Religions

      Read

      • Chapter 2 – Indigenous Religions

      Videos

      1. The Men of the Fifth World 

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 1
        2. LearnSmart Chapter 2
        3. Quiz 1
        4. Quiz 2
        5. Blog 1
        6. Blog 2
      WEEK 3
      September 6 - 13 

      Topic: Hinduism

      PowerPoint

      • Hinduism

      Read

      • Chapter 3 – Hinduism

      Videos

      1. Religions of the World: Hinduism 
      2. Indus Valley Civilization: Crash Course World History #2

      3. Birth of Krishna

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 3
        2. Quiz 3 
        3. Weekly Blog
      WEEK 4
      September 13 - Sept. 20

      Topic: Buddhism

      PowerPoint

      • Buddhism

      Read

      • Chapter 4 - Buddhism

      Videos

      1. The Life of Buddha 
      2. Buddha and Ashoka: Crash Course World History #6

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 4
        2. Quiz 4
        3. Weekly Blog
        4. Paper Proposal
      WEEK 5
      September 20 - Sept. 27

      Topic: Jainism & Sikhism

      PowerPoint

      • Jainism & Sikhism

      Read

      • Chapter 5 – Jainism & Sikhism

      Videos

      1. Minute Faith: Jainism
      2. The Story of Mahavira: Jainism & the Practice of Ahmisa

      3. An Interfaith Journey: Exploring Sikh Dharam

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 5
        2. Quiz 5 
        3. Weekly Blog
        4. Instagram Post
      WEEK 6
      September 27 - October 4

      Topic: Daoism & Confucianism

      PowerPoint

      • Daoism & Confucianism

      Read

      • Chapter 6 – Daoism & Confucianism

      Videos

      1. ‎2,000 Years of Chinese History! The Mandate of Heaven and Confucius: World History #7

      2. Life of Confucius

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 6
        2. Quiz 6
        3. Weekly Blog
      WEEK 7
      October 4 - October 12

      Extra day for Indigenous People's Day

      Topic: Shinto

      PowerPoint

      • Shinto

      Read

      • Chapter 7 – Shinto

      Videos

      1. Religion's of the world Shinto parts 1 - 4

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 7
        2. Quiz 7
        3. Weekly Blog
      WEEK 8
      October 11 - October 18 

      Midterm Exam

      Due

      1. Midterm Exam

       

      WEEK 9
      October 18 - October 25

      Topic: Judaism Part I

      PowerPoint

      • Judaism

      Read

      • Chapter 8 – Judaism – Part 1

      Videos

      1. Judaism Part 1 - 5
      2. Judaism: Inside the Torah - National Geographic

      Due: Work Ahead

      WEEK 10
      October 25 - November 1

      Topic: Judaism Part II

      PowerPoint

      • Judaism

      Read

      • Chapter 8 – Judaism - Part 2

      Videos

      1. Judaism Part 1 - 5
      2. Judaism: Inside the Torah - National Geographic

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 8
        2. Quiz 8
        3. Weekly Blog
        4. Instagram Post
        5. Initial Research Paper
      WEEK 11
      November 1 - November 8 

      Topic: Christianity Part I

      PowerPoint

      • Christianity

      Read

      • Chapter 9 – Christianity Part 1

      Videos

      1. Christianity from Judaism to Constantine: Crash Course World History #11
      2. Religions of the World: Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christianity
      3. Religions of the World: Protestant Christianity

      Due

        1. Weekly Blog
      WEEK 12
      November 8 - November 15

      Topic: Christianity Part II

      PowerPoint

      • Christianity Part 2

      Read

      • Chapter 9 – Christianity Part 2

      Videos

      1. Christianity from Judaism to Constantine: Crash Course World History #11
      2. Religions of the World: Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christianity
      3. Religions of the World: Protestant Christianity

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 9
        2. Quiz 9
        3. Weekly Blog
        4. Paper Peer Review
      WEEK 13
      November 15 - November 22

      Topic: Islam

      PowerPoint

      • Islam

      Read

      • Chapter 10 – Islam

      Videos

      1. Religions of the World Islam
      2. Islam and Politics: Crash Course World History 216
      3. Islam, the Qur'an, the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar: Crash Course World History #13

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 10
        2. Quiz 10
        3. Weekly Blog
        4. Final Research Paper Due
      WEEK 14
      November 22 - November 29

      Topic: Alternative Paths

      PowerPoint

      • Alternative Paths

      Read

      • Chapter 11 — Alternative Paths

      Videos

      1. What is Wicca - Religion for Breakfast

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 11
        2. Quiz 11
        3. Weekly Blog
      WEEK 15
      November 29 - December 6

      Topic: The Modern Search

      PowerPoint

      • The Modern Search

      Read

      • Chapter 12 – The Modern Search

        Videos

        1. Religion: Crash Course Sociology #39 

      Due

        1. LearnSmart Chapter 12
        2. Quiz 12 
        3. Weekly Blog
        4. Group Wiki Due
        5. Wiki iPeer Evaluation

      WEEK 16
      December 6 - Saturday, December 11

       Final Exam

      Due

        1. Final Exam
        2. Final Instagram Post
        3. Global Learning Quiz



 

Course Summary:

Date Details Due